Prejudiced

‘For those who believe, no proof is necessary. For those who don’t believe, no proof is possible.’

She was 16, a daughter of a hardworking mother, a jewel in the eyes of people, admired by the society, but all that changed…

He looked like a nice neighbour who couldn’t hurt a fly,  new to the vicinity and appeared responsible, her mother’s favourite customer…
***
Dolapo lived with her mother alone in a shambolic settlement on the outskirts of Lagos. They had moved from a comfortable apartment that had a view of the lake, pleasant scenery and nature whispering sweet melodies at sunrise and sunset right after she lost her dad, the breadwinner of the family. As fate would have it, her uncles swarmed in like honey bees and stripped them of everything they had, everything.

Dolapo, a beautiful young lady, with eyes like a starry sky, legs like freshly carved timber and body like something Michelangelo would draw. Dolapo. She was the joy of every eye that beheld her… But some didn’t just like what they saw…

Mr. Ajala was a businessman. He had just moved into the vicinity and lived alone in a building not too far from her mother’s shop. He was her mother’s favourite customer. If there were an award for buying and drinking alcohol at her mother’s shop he would have won unopposed. But that’s not the issue.

As a favourite customer he had privileges. Sometimes, when he couldn’t make it to the shop, he would call her mother to place an order and Dolapo would have to play delivery girl. Nobody liked the idea, but they had to sell. Money had to be made. Mr. Ajala never showed any obvious sign of callousness, so they had nothing to worry about… Or so they thought.

That day Mr. Ajala returned home late and placed an order. Dolapo went as usual in response to her mother’s favourite customer. But it wasn’t business as usual. Instead of collecting the order and paying, he offered her a seat. She declined to no avail and finally he was able to convince her. Few minutes later he went round her to whisper into her ears.

You’re a beautiful girl Dolapo, do you know that?

I get really lonely sometimes… I just wanted you to come.

Your hair smells nice.

As he ran a finger from her head to her neck, Dolapo made a run for the door but he was swifter. He pulled her to the wall and clipped her hands. Hard as she fought, his grip was nothing she could free herself from.

I want you Dolapo. I will make it quick and gentle.

The clouds had gathered in her starry eyes and like a troubled sea, streams of tears flowed down her face uncontrollably for she knew she couldn’t win this unless a miracle happened. I tell you most solemnly, no miracle was recorded that night!

She cried her way home that night. All the way, she thought about what she would do, how she would tell her mother, if she would believe her, what people would say… All the while, the coarse sound of Mr. Ajala’s voice as he cleaned her up reverberated in her being.

Don’t bother telling anyone… Noone will believe you… They’ll blame you for coming… They’ll say you wanted it too… They’ll hate you… Let this be our little secret… Next time you’ll like it… I’ll take care of your needs… You’re now a woman…

She could only cry. Her mother was worried sick. On seeing her daughter she leapt for joy, but her daughter was downcast. Dolapo thought for a while… To tell her mother or not? Her mother was afterall her everything… To tell!

Her mother wept. It was her own fault, she concluded. It would have been easier if it were her instead of her precious Dolapo, she cried. Her innocent daughter had been defiled by her ‘favourite customer’. But he always seemed good… He was… She couldn’t believe it!

Mr. Ajala was arrested. He never expected it. The truth about him began to unfold. They realised he had been married twice and had three issues from the two women. He had divorced his ex-wife and abandoned the children with their mothers. But who would have thought… He always seemed nice around Dolapo and her mum. Now they know, people aren’t always what they seem…

He’s a sick neighbour who has done one of the worst things anyone could do to a fellow human, hated by everyone especially her mother.

Unfortunately for Dolapo, her ovaries had released an egg when Mr. Ajala raped her…

She is 17, a mother of two (a set of twins), a wife to no one, looked down upon by people around her. Her mum is all she has, but what she really needs is love and concern from the society.
image

Advertisements

29 thoughts on “Prejudiced

  1. interesting read..in an era where a lot of people aren’t especially armed with the right definition of rape..or exonerate the rapist and shame the victim..this piece comes handy, as it hit right through the bone..

    Like

  2. That really took minutes of my time and I couldn’t take eyes off each lines of the story. Guess no reason justifies a rapist’s actions after all.

    Like

  3. Sandie,this is a lovely write-up and I pray for grace as you keep writing.It’s quite sad that our society today doesn’t give the issue of rape the importance it deserves,and I hope this article touches someone’s life out there.

    Like

  4. Hi Sandra, this is one side of you I didn’t know existed but I’m glad about that because this came as a pleasant surprise. I love the writeup, the subject is one dear to my heart and you did it justice. Thanks for enlightening people. Continue to be a shining light. Wishing you the best in all your endeavours.

    Like

  5. Nice article, very creative and I love the scenerio depicted. ‘Looks and characters could be deceiving so never trust anyone’

    Like

    1. Thank God there’s a law to take care of that now. .The victims just needs to be courageous to report it. ..and the law enforcement agencies just needs the diligence to enforce and implement the laws. ..May God help us all…

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s